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The covid-19 crisis could lead to institutional investors selling assets as they seek to shore up cash reserves, but livestock and broadacre cropping should be able to weather the storm for patient investors.
Import and export restrictions, logistical delays and the spread of the virus itself are introducing new complexities to food supply chains, says Decernis chief executive Kevin Kenny.
Windmill, Outback Australia
FIRB assessment process will now take six months instead of 30 days, with a $0 threshold for review applied to all transactions.
President and chair of ag industry bodies Chuck Conner says what is left of limited state resources must be allocated to processing H2A visas to avoid 'devastating impacts' on food production.
Shopping trolley in supermarket
During a time of unprecedented global crisis and widespread turmoil across asset classes, ag industry stakeholders continue to feel upbeat about their investments.
Sunflower field
The NCREIF Australian Farmland Index, which is heavily weighted to permanent cropping, shows total returns held up fairly well despite drought across much of eastern and northern Australia.
Rabobank’s Global Dairy Quarterly finds upwards price growth in late 2019 stalled early this year, with the uncertainty over covid-19 leading to investors scrambling to assess the impact.
The Sydney-based forestry investment manager has published its first Climate Disclosure Report and may publish fund-level climate targets in the future.
Cattle
Coller FAIRR’s climate risk tool for the animal meat industry predicts alternative proteins ‘will command at least 16% of the total meat market by 2050, potentially rising up to 62%.’
Assistant professor Sandro Steinbach says China’s use of new supply chains is likely to hurt the state’s exports more significantly in the long term.
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